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Socrates Essays & Research Papers

Best Socrates Essays

  • Socrates - 1725 Words
    Sophists cont'd 3) key pre understandings A all knowledge is relative B Culture, religion, and ethics are circumstantial and thereby changeable, rather than natural permanent and absolute 4) The sophists role in Athenian Democracy A The Shift to democract meant that clear speech and the power of persuation was indispensible B Sophists taught the art of rhetoric, the art of persuasive speech, not for the sake of truth, but for the sake of winning the argument 1 make a bad case...
    1,725 Words | 6 Pages
  • Socrates - 1153 Words
    Jennifer Conklin Question Three September 20, 2011 Socrates predominately values the state of the soul, therefore his decision to remain in prison, contrary to Crito’s wishes, condemning himself to death is the only plausible option. Socrates values focus on the soul, and the ways the state of the soul can remain in its best condition (Phil. 100 notes, 15 September). Support for this statement is readily visible when Socrates addresses the Athenian citizens: “For I go around doing nothing...
    1,153 Words | 4 Pages
  • Socrates - 1537 Words
    Philosophy 100 Paper One January 30, 2014 Arguments on the Crito In the Crito, Plato introduces several arguments that Socrates makes on whether or not it would be just for him to escape from prison when the Athenians have not acquitted him. Socrates begins by arguing that one must never do wrong. One of the most compelling arguments that he goes on to make is that doing harm to someone is wrong and therefore one must never engage in retaliatory harm. Under certain circumstances, such as...
    1,537 Words | 4 Pages
  • Socrates - 691 Words
    The Euthyphro dialogue is essentially a conversation between Socrates and Euthyphro each of who attempt to argue their point of justification about why they are in court or should not be there, which in turn a question develops about the gods and holiness. Euthyphro has a surprise encounter beside the porch of the king responsible for overseeing religious law. Euthyphro asks Socrates why he is there. Socrates states he has being persecuted by Meletus for corrupting the youth with his ideals...
    691 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Socrates Essays

  • Socrates - 650 Words
    Socrates was the son of Sophroniscus, an Athenian stonemason and sculptor, and Phaenarete, a midwife. He received a basic Greek education because he wasn’t from a noble family, where he learned his father’s craft at a young age. Socrates worked as a mason for many years before he devoted his life to philosophy. Socrates married Xanthippe, a younger woman, who gave him three sons- Lamprocles, Sophroniscus and Menexenus. There isn’t much known of Xanthippe. Only that she wasn’t happy with Socrates...
    650 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates - 527 Words
    The accusers, Meletos, Anytos, and Lycon, are all young and trying to make a name for themselves. They begin by telling everyone not to be deceived and to take caution because Socrates is a “clever speaker”. According to Socrates, the difference between him and his accusers is that he speaks the truth. He is on trial for two items, which include, corrupting the youth and impiety. Socrates tells everyone that he has no experience with the court and he will speak the way he is used to by being...
    527 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates - 1594 Words
    Alex Sosa 6/28/13 Intro to Humanities Prof. Smith SOCRATES Socrates was a man of many words, with more thoughts and questions than any man of his time. Socrates wrote nothing himself, leaving much of his life a mystery. As mysterious as he was, today we look at him as the Father of Philosophy. Most of what we know about him was depicted through works that Plato, his pupil, had written about him. These works were Crito, Phaedo, Lysis, Symposium, Euthyphyro and Apology, and with them being...
    1,594 Words | 4 Pages
  • socrates - 500 Words
    Money and Reputation more important than Wisdom and truth Throughout history money has been providing happiness and joy to most people. Allowing people to be free from financial issues and allowing then to achieve financial dreams however, money is not the total answer to success and happiness. Wisdom and truth are more important. The great Greek philosopher Socrates warned his fellow citizens by saying “are you not ashamed of heaping up the greatest amount of money and honour and...
    500 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates And The Afterlife - 808 Words
     Socrates & the Afterlife Socrates & the Afterlife “When I have drunk the poison I shall leave you and go to the joys of the blessed…” (Plato, p.67) In his final hours, as written in Plato’s Phaedo, Socrates spoke of death and the afterlife while awaiting his execution. Socrates was tried and convicted of two charges: corrupting the youth and impiety (blasphemy), he was imprisoned and sentenced to death. According to his final words, Socrates does not seem to fear death but instead sees...
    808 Words | 2 Pages
  • Histery of Socrates - 1575 Words
    The topic of my paper is the philosophy of Socrates. Specifically I will discuss Socratic irony and the Socratic method of inquiry. The main points I will cover are; what was Socratic irony, and why did he use the method he did to seek the truth? My paper consists of three main parts. First a description of the more important books by Plato, about Socrates; sines Plato is the main source for information about Socrates. The second part is an analysis of the texts, focusing on the above stated...
    1,575 Words | 5 Pages
  • Socrates: A Biography - 850 Words
    ***** **** *** ******** ****** * *** ** **** Socrates, the Philosopher Socrates was a Greek Philosopher who was particularly “interesting.” What made him interesting was that he was very unique compared to all the other Athens during 469 B.C. . This ranged from looks, the way he thought, and his actions. Back then, looking good was the measured through the standards of the gods. Socrates, who didn’t really care for appearance, looked very “ugly” compared to the others. Socrates had wide...
    850 Words | 3 Pages
  • Life and Socrates - 594 Words
    Phaedo Philosophy is a vast field. It examines and probes many different fields. Virtue, morality, immortality, death, and the difference between the psyche (soul) and the soma (body) are just a few of the many different topics which can be covered under the umbrella of philosophy. Philosophers are supposed to be experts on all these subjects. The have well thought out opinions, and they are very learned people. Among the most revered philosophers of all time was Socrates. Living...
    594 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates and the Soul - 1105 Words
    Socrates believed the most important task, in life, was to care for ones soul. Socrates argues that the soul is immortal and that we must rise above our physical nature in order to gain true knowledge. He believed the soul was our very essence, and our bodies the instrument utilized in dealing with the physical world. Socrates seemed confidant that human beings survive physical death, therefore possessing an immortal soul. He felt a philosophers concern was not with the body but with the soul...
    1,105 Words | 3 Pages
  • Defense of Socrates - 1903 Words
    Apology: Defence Of Socrates By: Gregory Klima Apology Defense Of Socrates Plato's The Apology is an account of the speech Socrates makes at the trial in which he is charged with the following 1) Not recognizing the gods recognized by the state 2) Corrupting the youth of Athens For the most part, Socrates spoke in a very plain, conversational manner, as one would speak to a friend or lecture a child. He explained that he has no experience with courts and demeanor that comes with , he...
    1,903 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Trial of Socrates - 1555 Words
    In the trial of Socrates, I juror number 307, Ryan Callahan vote the defendant is Not Guilty on the first charge of Corrupting the youth. My justifications for this vote are as follows. Socrates didn't corrupt the youth, he just shared his ideas with them and they in turn chose the path to take these ideas. Part of understanding this case is understand the time in which the case was held. This time being 399 B.C., a time in which Athens was a free democratic city, a town which prided...
    1,555 Words | 4 Pages
  • Socrates' Crito - 2666 Words
    The whole of the dialogue takes place at Socrates’ prison cell, where he awaits his execution just days away. It started with Socrates waking up and finding his friend and loyal disciple Crito there. When Socrates asked how Crito got inside the prison at that early an hour, Crito told him that he simply knows the guard and has done the guard some favor. Crito then informed Socrates that the ship from Delos has already come in and tomorrow will be his execution. Socrates then told Crito about a...
    2,666 Words | 6 Pages
  • Truth and Socrates - 928 Words
    Brenda Armstrong PHI 208 Ethics and Moral Reasoning Instructor: Daniel Haynes April 22, 2013 Euthyphro – Plato Explain how the concept of holiness...
    928 Words | 3 Pages
  • Defense on Socrates - 1610 Words
    Defense on Socrates There are times in every mans life where our actions and beliefs collide—these collisions are known as contradictions. There are endless instances in which we are so determined to make a point that we resort to using absurd overstatements, demeaning language, and false accusations in our arguments. This tendency to contradict ourselves often questions our character and morals. Similarly, in The Trial of Socrates (Plato's Apology), Meletus' fallacies in reason and his...
    1,610 Words | 4 Pages
  • Socrates And Achilles - 1452 Words
    Socrates and Achilles: the Martyr Heroes Madelyn Vogel ILS 205 By comparing himself to the Greek hero Achilles before the jury in Plato’s Apology, Socrates attempts to portray himself as a hero of equal merit to Achilles and others of similar standing. By selecting the greatest of the Classical Greeks to compare and contrast himself to in his argument, Socrates surreptitiously urges his audience to view him as being of the same caliber as Achilles. This not only authenticates Socrates’ claims,...
    1,452 Words | 4 Pages
  • socrates biography - 594 Words
    Socrates was born in 470BC in Athens; he was the son of Sophroniscus, an Athenian stone mason and sculptor, and Phaenarete, a midwife. Because he wasn't from a noble family, he probably received a basic Greek education and learned his father's craft at a young age. It is believed Socrates worked as mason for many years before he devoted his life to philosophy. Socrates married Xanthippe, a younger woman, who bore him three sons, Lamprocles, Sophroniscus and Menexenus. There is little known...
    594 Words | 2 Pages
  • socrates paper - 1728 Words
    PHI 150 Socrates Paper Socrates is believed to be one of the greatest philosophers of all time and he is credited as being the founder of western philosophy. This paper will explain some of his views to the most fundamental questions of today’s age. These questions will include topics about morality, the human condition, solution, and death. After Socrates’ views on these topics are explained, a critique will be done on his answers. I will start out by explaining exactly who Socrates...
    1,728 Words | 5 Pages
  • Socrates and Zen - 1592 Words
    Socrates and Zen The differences between Eastern and Western philosophies are very pronounced. Western mentality is generally based upon a rational, ordered system of categories that encourage the continual search for truth and knowledge through science or religion. Conversely, Eastern mentality maintains that life is a journey towards self-discovery of oneself and the unexplainable universe. However the drastic divide between Eastern and Western thoughts may not have always been so...
    1,592 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Apology of Socrates - 591 Words
    In Plato’s “Apology of Socrates,” Socrates is defending himself before the Athenian jury. In addition, you can consider the Phaedo (the very end), where you have an account of Socrates’ conduct at the very end of his life, in the moments before his execution. Further, in “The Allegory of the Cave,” in Plato’s The Republic, Socrates describes his views about the nature of Truth and knowledge. In these texts, Socrates reveals a number of things about himself and his beliefs: how he makes a...
    591 Words | 3 Pages
  • Socrates & the Afterlife - 545 Words
    Socrates & the Afterlife The realization of death did not leave Socrates in any state of sorrow but rather gave him hope and happiness that he would soon be moving further onto what he believed was the path of the soul. Socrates had no fear of death because he believed specifically in the afterlife and that the soul left the body and moved on to the next phase in life. Socrates states that there are many pathways a soul can follow after death; all depending on how a person acted...
    545 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates and Descartes - 920 Words
    To say that a man is defined by what he does in his life is an understatement when you think of two of the greatest philosophers ever. Each man was very respected while they were living but when you have hundreds or thousands of people still talking about you after your death there is something very special to say about that. Socrates and Rene Descartes spent their life looking for the truth. They looked for the perfect answer to every question because both of them wanted the answers no one...
    920 Words | 3 Pages
  • Outline of Socrates - 462 Words
    Socrates: 1. Sophists ~> professional teachers... Socrates was the greatest of them all (469-399 B.C.E.) 2. Followed the Sophists' lead in turning away from the study of the cosmos and concentrating on the case of the human. Unlike the way the Sophists discoursed about the human being, he wanted to base all argumentation on objectively valid definitions. 3. Socrates' discourse moved in two directions A. Outward - to objective definitions B. Inward - to discover the inner person, the...
    462 Words | 2 Pages
  • Opinions on Socrates - 679 Words
    When analyzing Socrates as a person, I think it is apparent that there is much more to his personality than appears on the surface. Many people assume that his aims are pure, that he questions those around him solely in the pursuit of knowledge. I think that if his conversations are considered as a whole, strong arrogance shows through. Socrates often flatters the person he is questioning in order to initiate the debate and he continues to do this as the conversation progresses in order to...
    679 Words | 2 Pages
  • Plato and Socrates - 472 Words
    Plato and Socrates Classical Greece in the 4th and 5th centuries BC was a period in which some of history’s greatest philosophers lived. The relationship between Plato, and his mentor Socrates was, for Plato, one of reverence. Plato viewed his teacher as an inspiration and as a philosophical model to emulate. Plato was a student of Socrates. Plato is the main eye-witness source for the life of Socrates and we know from his account of Socrates’ trial that Plato was a student at the time....
    472 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates Biography - 418 Words
    The Biography of Socrates. Socrates was born in 470 BC in Circa Athens Greece. His father Sophroniscus was a stone carver and sculpture and his mother was a midwife. He was short and stocky, he had huge eyes and a stubby nose; fortunately he always emphasized the idea that the mind is more important than the looks of the physical body of the thinker. in other words, don't judge a book by its cover. Socrates because was as not a noble did not get a full education, but he did however get some...
    418 Words | 1 Page
  • Questions on Socrates - 1149 Words
     What did Socrates Stand for? 1. What are the needs of the political community? What must all political communities do to insure their survival? What about Philosophy? What does philosophy seek? How does it go about this process? Before we get into what are the needs of a political community, lets define politics. What comes to your mind when you think of politics? For the purpose of this class, politics is the identification, maintenance, and transfer of the communities’ core values that...
    1,149 Words | 4 Pages
  • Socrates Worldview - 1830 Words
    Socrates Worldview Origin This question focuses on why there is something rather than nothing. Socrates uses the theory of recollection as evidence to prove his theory of creation. This theory of creation introduces that our souls have an existence before this earthly life. Socrates believes that, “…the living have come from the dead no less than the dead from the living” (72a Phaedo). He then takes the previous statement and concludes, “…that if this was so, it was a sufficient proof...
    1,830 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Death of Socrates - 785 Words
    The Death of Socrates “The Death of Socrates” was painted by a French painter . His name was Jacques Louis David. The painting represents the scene of the death of Greek philosopher Socrates. He was condemned to die by drinking hemlock for the expression of his ideas against those of Athens' and corrupting the minds of the youth. The painting also depicts both Plato and Crito, with the former sitting at the edge of the bed and the latter clutching the knee of Socrates. Socrates had the...
    785 Words | 2 Pages
  • Question and Socrates - 1157 Words
    Euthyphro – Plato Kristen B M Ashford University PHI208: Ethics and Moral Reasoning Instructor Marc McGrath February 11, 2013 Euthyphro – Plato The Euthyphro is a tale of Socrates and Euthyphro. They meet by chance and end up discussing what is holy and what is piety. Socrates tries to get answers from Euthyphro but because of his unwillingness to learn, they end back at the beginning of their discussion. In Euthyphro, we see the three distinct definitions of piety and holiness...
    1,157 Words | 4 Pages
  • Elenchus and Socrates - 2549 Words
    Mark Abby PHL 414 Plato Mid-Term February 20, 2012 The phrase “Socratic method” gets tossed around quite a bit during the course of a liberal arts education. One way of describing this method is teaching by means of asking. The thought is that by asking questions, a teacher may trigger some thought in the student’s mind which comes about more organically and effectively than by the means of traditional lecture. Employing the Socratic method allows a teacher to guide a student’s train of...
    2,549 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Death of Socrates - 734 Words
    The Death of Socrates” was painted by a French painter . His name was Jacques Louis David. The painting represents the scene of the death of Greek philosopher Socrates. He was condemned to die by drinking hemlock for the expression of his ideas against those of Athens' and corrupting the minds of the youth. The painting also depicts both Plato and Crito, with the former sitting at the edge of the bed and the latter clutching the knee of Socrates. Socrates had the choice to go into exile and ,...
    734 Words | 2 Pages
  • THE APOLOGY OF SOCRATES. - 12076 Words
    THE APOLOGY OF SOCRATES. I know not, O Athenians! how far you have been influenced by my accusers for my part, in listening to them I almost forgot myself, so plausible were their arguments however, so to speak, they have said nothing true. But of the many falsehoods which they uttered I wondered at one of them especially, that in which they said that you ought to be on your guard lest you should be deceived by me, as being eloquent in speech. For that they are not ashamed of being forthwith...
    12,076 Words | 26 Pages
  • Plato and Socrates - 1676 Words
    Socrates, in his conviction from the Athenian jury, was both innocent and guilty as charged. In Plato's Five Dialogues, accounts of events ranging from just prior to Socrates' entry into the courthouse up until his mouthful of hemlock, both points are represented. Socrates' in dealing with moral law was not guilty of the crimes he was accused of by Meletus. Socrates was only guilty as charged because his peers had concluded him as such. The laws didn't find Socrates guilty; Socrates was...
    1,676 Words | 4 Pages
  • Socrates Apologizes - 1720 Words
    An Apology From Socrates' The Apology is Socrates' defense at his trial. As the dialogue begins, Socrates notes that his accusers have cautioned the jury against Socrates'eloquence, according to Socrates, the difference between him and his accusers is that Socrates speaks the truth. Socrates distinguished two groups of accusers: the earlier and the later accusers. The earlier group is the hardest to defend against, since they do not appear in court. He is all so accused of being a Sophist: that...
    1,720 Words | 4 Pages
  • Socrates Worldviews - 1851 Words
     Like many philosophers, Socrates has been able to mold and enlighten his students and people well past his time. One of his most famous quotes, “I only know that I know nothing,” Never fails to capture attention. As simple as the words are it never failed to spark a conversation that exceeds expectations. Origin: • Where did the universe come from? Where did life/humanity come from? • Socrates does not clearly state an answer for Origin. I do find that his Theory of Recollection to...
    1,851 Words | 6 Pages
  • Essay on Socrates - 2152 Words
    The First Advocate for Free Speech – Socrates The precise facts about how and why the great Greek philosopher Socrates was sentenced and executed remains one of the biggest puzzles in history, even to this day. Socrates lived and philosophized in Athens, which is said to be the ancient model for a democracy. Yet, it seems like the Athenians sentenced to death a respected member of their society for speaking his mind and standing by his principles. Now how democratic is that? What makes...
    2,152 Words | 5 Pages
  • Socrates The Afterlife - 436 Words
    Option 1: Socrates & the Afterlife Read selections from The Phaedo, available in this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings. Focus on paragraphs 107 to 115a (pp. 437–444). Write a 350- to 700-word essay on the following: • Why does Socrates not fear death? • What are his views on death and the afterlife? • Do you agree or disagree with Socrates on this topic? • Using the Socratic method and The Good Thinker’s Tool Kit, formulate at least one question you would ask Socrates about his views on...
    436 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reflection on Socrates - 704 Words
    "I trust what I say is right," is only one of the wise remarks that Socrates makes. He is a very confident man, but he expresses his confidence in an ironic way by his intricate sentences and clever remarks. His trial is interesting because he hits key points: why he is being accused, why he should be acquitted and finally why he feels it is acceptable that he is convicted. He contradicts himself frequently because at one point he flaunts his wisdom and great intellectual qualities and then he...
    704 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates Understanding - 594 Words
    | Socrates Understanding | Beverly Melcher | Ethics and Moral Reasoning: PHI 208 Dione Johnson | | 3/3/2013 | Socrates Understanding The concept of holiness emerges into the dialogue when Socrates is trying to find out how to address the gods in a proper way. He is also trying to find out the definition of piety and impiety from the gods point of view. The reason for this is so that the man, Meletus, who feels that he is bring justified charges against Socrates to the gods,...
    594 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates Death - 1084 Words
    Socrates’ death To begin with, we need to introduce Socrates. Socrates was and still regarded as one of the most influential philosophers. Socrates throughout his life showed a deep understanding of the human life, as well as an understanding of the world. He is considered one of the most important ethical philosophers of all time. Nothing much is known about his personal life, but his works were well preserved which revealed a lot about him as a great man. Socrates was sentenced to death...
    1,084 Words | 3 Pages
  • Socrates' Apology - 451 Words
    The Apology shows the importance of truth and justice throughout the historical development of ancient Greece and of the world in general. The Trojan War plays an important role in Socrates’ apology, showing how our historical development seems predetermined by a higher force or God. Aquilles, similar to Socrates followed the Oracle of Delphi prophecies, which not only determined his fames but his death too. Thus, Plato use of Palamedes in the Apology clarifies, then, Plato’s desire to seek for...
    451 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Death of Socrates - 323 Words
    The Greek Philosopher, Socrates, questioned the wisdom, and the truth of the Greek gods which then got him sentenced to death. In Plato’s “The Death of Socrates” text and also in Jaques-Louis David’s painting “The Death of Socrates”, Socrates’ followers are upset by his imminent death while Socrates himself is welcoming it. In Plato’s text, he quotes Socrates when he says, “..when I have drunk the poison I shall leave you and go to the joys of the blessed…” He knows that even after he dies, his...
    323 Words | 1 Page
  • Socrates Summary - 2190 Words
    Accusations made against Socrates:
corrupting of youth, allowing them to question authority not respecting traditional gods introducing new gods He was ugly so people thought he was evil Socrates Life: 469BC- 399BC Born: 469 B.C. Birthplace: Athens, Greece Died: 399 B.C. (execution by poison) Best Known As: The great Greek philosopher who drank hemlock Socrates is the ancient Greek thinker who laid the early foundations for Western philosophical thought. His "Socratic Method"...
    2,190 Words | 6 Pages
  • Truth and Socrates - 1993 Words
    Euthyphro is a dialogue between Socrates and a traveling cleric. The two men meet at court, where the cleric, Euthyphro, claims to have a clear definition of piety. Socrates exclaims that he wishes to know the definition of piety so that he may better defend himself in his upcoming trial. Euthyphro agrees to teach Socrates, and so they begin to discuss. Early on, Socrates makes clear his desire for a universal truth, or a definition of piety that will be true in every case. Euthyphro makes...
    1,993 Words | 6 Pages
  • Socrates on Justice - 1235 Words
    Socrates’ take on justice was a rather controversial viewpoint for his era, in that he opined about virtues men should possess and strive for that they might otherwise have no desire to obtain. A just man strives to promote justice for the sake of justice in itself. He, as one who is good, seeks to further justice because it fulfills his daimon, or nature. The nature of man is therefore, naturally, to do the right and proper thing. Good, as the nature of man, is what man desires, needs, and yet...
    1,235 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Trial of Socrates: an Analysis and Construction of Socrates Defense
    The Trial of Socrates: An Analysis and Construction of Socrates Defense Understanding the decisions made by the jurymen in Socrates trial will always be a mystery, but one can perceive why some would have voted the way that they did. Politically and historically Athens was a thriving place of innovation and philosophical advancements. Athens could very well be divided, morally on various aspects, one of them being which “political” affiliation Athenians related themselves with. Some...
    2,363 Words | 6 Pages
  • Socrates' Stand on Democracy - 1822 Words
    Reusi 1 Raye Reusi D. Ryals Writing 1 November 14, 2012 Socrates’ Stand on Democracy Having emphasized upon me the advantages of democracy, I have always believed that it is the best system to implement in a country. Ignoring the flaws and weaknesses of this type of system, I thought that the benefits outweigh all costs. I assume that giving the power to the people is better than having one person rule the state. However, in Plato’s account on the life of his mentor Socrates, we are able to see...
    1,822 Words | 5 Pages
  • Socrates (Defense), the Apology
    Socrates – “The Apology” or (Defense) Socrates had no written work, never had a job and there are questions of whether he was even literate. However, Plato was a student of Socrates and recorded what occurred at his death trial. Socrates asked lots of questions and made people with political power look stupid. At no time during his trial does he claim to be innocent. He (attacks his accuser instead) There were two types of charges brought against him. - The new or (Official)...
    1,025 Words | 4 Pages
  • Apology from Socrates - 541 Words
    An apology From Socrates An Apology From Socrates' The Apology is Socrates' defense at his trial. As the dialogue begins, Socrates notes that his accusers have cautioned the jury against Socrates'eloquence, according to Socrates, the difference between him and his accusers is that Socrates speaks the truth. Socrates distinguished two groups of accusers: the earlier and the later accusers. The earlier group is the hardest to defend against, since they do not appear in court. He is all so...
    541 Words | 2 Pages
  • Philosophies of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle
    Philosophies of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle The philosophies of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle had different points of-view but they were also similar in some ways. For example, all three philosophers had their own thoughts on the subject of justice and government. Socrates belief on this matter was that democracy was an unwise form of government. He thought that the electing of the people was unfair justice. Plato had some of the same beliefs. He believed that government should only...
    448 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates: on Life, Death and the Afterlife
    BD Socrates’ views of death as represented in “The Trial and Death of Socrates” are irrevocably tied to his beliefs of what makes life significant. For Socrates, life must be examined through constant questioning and one must hold the goodness of life above all else. Consequently, even in the face of the un-good, or unjust in Socrates’ case as represented in his trial, it would not be correct to do wrong, return wrong or do harm in return for harm done. Therefore, no act should be performed...
    1,419 Words | 3 Pages
  • Plato's Apology of Socrates - 1704 Words
    • Last Class: November 21st • Apology is a public speech; Crtio is a private speech • Socrates ○ was the first philosopher concerned with human affairs (ethics, morality) ○ Socrates originally devoted his time to science ○ Later abandoned science and shifted attention to ethics-philosophy ○ Never wrote anything; so how do we know anything about him? Because of: § Plato § Xenophon § Aristophanes (Clouds)- accuser ○ Plato is the mouth piece of Socrates in most...
    1,704 Words | 7 Pages
  • Plato and Socrates Place Rulers
    Describe Socrates’ reasons (in the Crito), for refusing to escape from prison. In the text Crito, is compose of the Socrates’ and Crito’s dialogues whether escaping from the prison or not. Because of the corrupting youth Socrates sentenced to death. By ask questions Socrates made people questioned their belief. Therefore Socrates called as ‘god fly’. After all these cases Crito try to convince Socrates to escape from the prison. However Socrates does not want to escape. According to...
    310 Words | 1 Page
  • Socrates Arguments Crito - 1451 Words
    Ryan Horler What arguments are presented in the Crito for the conclusion that Socrates would be acting unjustly if he escaped from prison and evaded his sentence? Do you find them convincing? The Platonic 'Death of Socrates Dialogues', are a quartet of important and influential conversations written by Plato, but told through the eyes of his mentor Socrates. Written in 386BC, they tell the story surrounding the Socrates being charged by the state for piety and corruption of the...
    1,451 Words | 7 Pages
  • Socrates Best Kind of Life
    Everyone in society has different views on the best kind of life. Some people think that the best kind of life is one that is filled with family. Some may think that it is concerning living life without any regrets and being prosperous, healthy and having someone to share it all with. But this is not the case for Socrates. Having very profound views about what could be called the best kind of life for a human being. This paper is going to explore four areas that Socrates believes makes up...
    1,228 Words | 3 Pages
  • Socrates, Plato. and Aristotle Matrix
    Axia College Material Appendix C Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle Matrix Fill in the matrix below, denoting each philosopher’s view concerning the topics listed. Write NA if there is no record in the textbook of the philosopher’s view on the specific topic. Then, using the information you inserted into the matrix as a guide, write a 350-700 word response describing how Socrates’, Plato’s, and Aristotle’s philosophies relate to each other. |...
    851 Words | 3 Pages
  • Plato and Socrates Anthology - 998 Words
    Socrates Anthology and Plato Plato: I: Apology 1. What are the charges brought against Socrates by his Athenian accusers and what is his reply concerning the sort of wisdom he in fact possesses? The charges that were brought against Socrates were corrupting the young and Impiety. Socrates says “If you ask me what kind of wisdom, I reply, wisdom such as may perhaps be attained by man, for to that extent I am inclined to believe that I am wise; Whereas the persons of whom I was speaking have...
    998 Words | 3 Pages
  • Athens vs Socrates - 1521 Words
    Athenian democracy ensures that a citizen in a society acts according to what society deems appropriate rather than by an individual's assumptions of what is acceptable. Athens as a whole stresses the importance of an active citizen whose life is intertwined with the government. In essence, an Athenian citizen can participate in the decision making of the state and will be enthusiastic in carrying out policies that pass in the assembly. Pericles, an Athenian statesman, makes it clear when he...
    1,521 Words | 4 Pages
  • Socrates and Anti-Democracy - 903 Words
    Socrates and the Anti-Democracy The trial, determination of guilt, and eventual death of Socrates, one of the paramount philosophers in history, on the charge of “corrupting the young and of not believing in the gods in whom the city believes” (Plato 24c) in Athens, perhaps the most famous freedom-loving, democratic city-state of the Western world, is puzzling. In his earlier days, Socrates was once seen as an eccentric headmaster of a school of thinking, a harmless character wandering the...
    903 Words | 3 Pages
  • Socrates, Philosophy and the Good Life
    Socrates, Philosophy and the Good Life Socrates' belief was that he was called on by the Gods to live his life examining others and himself. He believed the necessity of doing what one thinks is right even in the face of universal opposition, and the need to pursue knowledge even when opposed. "I became completely convinced, to the duty of leading the philosophical life by examining myself and others."¹ Socrates believed that to desert this idea was ridiculous and would make his life...
    2,617 Words | 7 Pages
  • Antigone vs. Socrates in the Crito
    Sophocles' play "Antigone" illustrates the conflict between obeying human and divine law. The play opens after Oedipus' two sons Eteocles and Polyneices have killed each other in a civil war for the throne of Thebes. Oedipus' brother in law Creon then assumes the throne. He dictates that Eteocles shall receive a state funeral and honors, while Polyneices shall be left in the streets to rot away. Creon believes that Polyneices' body shall be condemned to this because of his civil disobedience and...
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  • Was Socrates Wise? - 1049 Words
    Ross 1 Ross 1 Matt Ross Mr. Cartwright October 29, 2010 HZT 4U1 Matt Ross Mr. Cartwright October 29, 2010 HZT 4U1 Wise Men Argue Causes, Fools Decide Them. Socrates, an Athenian philosopher who lived from 469 BC until his very unnecessary death in 399 BC, has had his wisdom called into question many times since he has been studied. But to know whether some is wise, we must first know what it means to be wise. According...
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  • Socrates on why Death is a Blessing
    Plato's Apology discusses the trial of a philosopher from Athens named Socrates. During the trial Socrates is accused of rejecting the gods of the city and creating his own, as well as corrupting the youth of Athens. He unsuccessfully attempts to persuade the jury of his innocence, and is bestowed a verdict of 'guilty.' In response to the jury's decision, Socrates attempts to illustrate why death should be considered a blessing. I will argue that although Socrates presents possibilities that...
    1,449 Words | 4 Pages
  • Clouds Socrates Unjust Speech
    The Carnage of Just Speech William Myers Section Eschenburg Thursday 9:00am Topic B Aristophanes & Pericles In Aristophanes’ play, “clouds”, there is a battle between the “old” and “new” way of going out about life. This can be seen through the “just” and “unjust” speech, whose argumentative outcomes dictate the way in which society should go about educating its citizens. The “unjust speech”, which is a heavy logical and manipulative approach to thinking...
    2,144 Words | 6 Pages
  • Socrates: the greatest philosopher
    Essay 2: Who is The Most Important Greek Philosopher? Ancient Greek Philosophy is credited to be one of the most influential periods of philosophy in the history of the world. Ideas and theories created during this era have great significance and importance even to today’s society. Many would consider the philosophers who were part of this era to be the greatest of all time. The likes of Plato, Aristotle, Pythagoras, and many more helped develop hundreds of theories and ideas that changed...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates vs Protagoras - 1711 Words
    Philosophy Socrates a sophist? Or just sophisticated? Plato goes a long way in attempting to distinguish Socrates from the likes of Protagoras, a self admitted sophist. In Protagoras, Socrates is depicted as a street smart, wisdom dispensing young man, brash with confidence and a bit of arrogance that goes a long way when confronted with the old school rhetoric of Protagoras. Plato begins to separate the two at the hip right from the get go. The dialogue between Socrates and his inquisitive...
    1,711 Words | 5 Pages
  • Socrates vs Sophists - 1798 Words
    Socrates and the Sophists (Plato's Dialogues) In chapter 4, The Sophist: Protagoras, Soccio does an excellent job discussing a group of teachers and thinkers known collectively as sophists, and the social environment in which they flourished for a time. These professional educators were known for being widely travelled and thus having much experience with other cultures. This experience convinced many of them that there is no such thing as 'objective standards;' we merely have a set of...
    1,798 Words | 6 Pages
  • Compare Socrates with the Sophists
    Compare and contrast the moral outlook of Socrates and the Sophists Although both the Sophists and Socrates are considered philosophers due to their interest in human morality, their outlook regarding the subject of Truth differs greatly. The sophists were sceptics on the matter of the existence of eternal Truth, whilst to Socrates Truth was an absolute. This can be clearly seen in their varying epistemologies. The Sophists were a group of intellectuals that travelled extensively throughout...
    1,072 Words | 3 Pages
  • Examining Socrates in Crito - 1350 Words
    Philosophy 25A, Essay 1 Yue Lu, 23903154, Oct 1st Examining Socrates in Crito In the Dialogue Crito, Socrates employs his Elenchus to examine the notion of justice and one’s obligation to justice. In the setting of the dialogue, Socrates has been condemned to die, and Crito comes with both the hopes and the means for Socrates to escape from prison. When Socrates insists that they should examine whether he should escape or not, the central question turns into whether if it is unjust to...
    1,350 Words | 4 Pages
  • Plato&Socrates Excellence in Virtue
    Plato & Socrates: Excellence in Virtue introduction “Socrates’ positive influence touches us even today” (May 6) and we can learn a great deal about him from one of his students, Plato. It is in Plato’s report of Socrates’ trial a work entitled, Apology, and a friend’s visit to his jail cell while he is awaiting his death in Crito, that we discover a man like no other. Socrates was a man following a path he felt that the gods had wanted him to follow and made no excuses for his life...
    3,643 Words | 10 Pages
  • Plato- Last Days of Socrates
    Plato's Crito Plato's "Crito" is a dialogue between Socrates and one of his closest friends Crito. The entire dialogue takes place in Socrates prison cell, where he awaits execution. Crito visits Socrates before dawn in order to persuade him to escape from prison and flee to another city or country. Crito has made all the necessary arrangements to smuggle Socrates out of prison to safety. To Crito's despair Socrates seems quite willing to accept his execution, and so Crito presents as many...
    1,073 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Destructive Cross-Examination of Socrates
    Socrates spent most of his life in Athens. During his life he witnessed the rise and glory of Athens and the rapid decline of Athens during the Peloponnesian war. Socrates met and talked with a variety of people such as politicians, statesmen, sophists, poets, architects, and ordinary citizens. He taught philosophy to the youth of Athens, devoted friends, and pupils like Crito. Plato was one of Socrates’ students, and he is considered to be most brilliant student of Socrates. In fact, Plato is...
    2,204 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Apology: the Trial and Death of Socrates
    The Apology is Plato's account of Socrates defense against the charges that Meletus, Anytus and Lycon had brought before the Athenian court. These charges we impiety and confusing the minds of the youth. In the beginning of his defense he points out that there had been previous accusations against him. He had been accused of being a sophist - who were people that taught the art of rhetoric not based on truth, and made the weaker argument strong - he was accused for questioning things above...
    392 Words | 2 Pages
  • Effectiveness of the Apology of Socrates - 1276 Words
    It happened to Jesus Christ, Galileo, and many other powerful philosophers. These men were put to death because of their radical beliefs that were contrary to the philosophy of the society in which they preached. Abinidi was burned because of his calling the people of Zeniff to repentance. Jesus Christ was crucified by the Jews because of his so-called “blasphemy.” Although not exactly put to death, Galileo was imprisoned for life because of his research and theories on physical science that...
    1,276 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Trial And Death Of Socrates - 1046 Words
     The Trial and Death Of Socrates Socrates was charged and had many accusations against him by three men. Meletus whom was the principle accuser, Anytus the power behind the prosectution, and Lycon the third accuser. During the first three hours of trial, Meletus and the other two accusers each mounted a small stage in the law court in the center of Athens to deliver speeches to the jury making the case for the guilt of Socrates. Meletus, the youngest of the three accusers made two...
    1,046 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Elentic Method of Socrates - 330 Words
    Socrates is a Classical Greek Athenian philosopher. He was one of the founders of Western philosophy. He was born around 470 BCE and died in 399 BCE. He became very well- known through his students Plato and Xenophon. He had his insistence on the truth and on being honest, which led to his execution. Socrates was a brilliant man in what he has done. There was said that he was “corrupting the youth of Athens not to worship the city gods and of introducing new gods” Johnston (2006: 8). All he has...
    330 Words | 1 Page
  • Socrate and the Examined Life - 1366 Words
    The significance of the Examined life Adrian Eames 951105878 Section leader: Elizabeth Grosz The Trial and Death of Socrates takes place during a time in Socrates life where he becomes most reflective. During these final moments of Socrates life a theme arises, that of the unexamined life. Socrates claims that “the unexamined life is not worth living” (Apology 38a). Profound as the statement may seem it creates many questions; what is the unexamined life? And why is the idea of an examined...
    1,366 Words | 4 Pages
  • Socrates: Philosophy to Science - 1787 Words
     Science – or, with respect to this writing, natural philosophy – is concerned with observing, collecting and analyzing natural phenomena in order to form a collective body of knowledge that defines, explains and attempts to predict the respective phenomenon being studied. Although science, at least in its contemporary definition, did not begin until sometime during the fifteenth century AD1, the intricacies that form its core have technically been occurring since arrival of Homo sapiens on the...
    1,787 Words | 5 Pages
  • Trial and Death of Socrates - 2267 Words
    Benjamin Jowett. The Trial and Death of Socrates (Dover Edition). New York: Dover Publications, 1992 “What is the charge? Well, a very serious charge, which shows a good deal of character in the young man, and for which he is certainly not to be despised. He says he knows how the youth are corrupted and who are their corruptors. And I fancy that he must be a wise man, and seeing that I am anything but a wise man, he has found me out, and is going to accuse me of corrupting his young...
    2,267 Words | 5 Pages
  • Socrates, Plato and Aristotle - 966 Words
    Socrates: Socrates was born in Athens about 470 BC and lived until 399 BC, he was a classical Greek Athenian philosopher and is credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy. An accurate picture of the man, his life, and viewpoints are problematic because he did not write any philosophical texts, everything we know is based on writings by his students and contemporaries… this is what is known as the Socratic problem. Socrates was later tried and put to death for “corrupting the youth...
    966 Words | 3 Pages
  • Socrates' Unexamined Life - 1634 Words
    Why does Socrates think that the unexamined life is not worth living? Does he have a good defense of his philosophical life? As the wisest man in all of ancient Greece, Socrates believed that the purpose of life was both personal and spiritual growth. He establishes this conviction in what is arguably his most renowned statement: "The unexamined life is not worth living." Socrates makes it quite evident through the severity of the language in this claim, the extent to which he will...
    1,634 Words | 5 Pages
  • forum 2 The apology Socrates
    2) Socrates did not always think that he was wise, many people labeled him as a teacher. Socrates did not really care for this label. He did not really think that he knew much. Socrates had a friend named Chaerephon who went to the oracle the God of Delphi. Cheaerephon asked the oracle is there any one wiser then Socrates, the oracle answered no (21a). Socrates did not understand this and set out to prove the oracle wrong. While out to prove the oracle wrong Socrates realized he is wise but not...
    266 Words | 1 Page
  • Socrates Holiness and Justice - 1150 Words
     Is there a difference between holiness and justice? Evaluate with reference to the Plato dialogue on Euthyphro. Holiness can be defined as a condition of purity or freedom from sin. To be holy is to be dedicated or consecrated to God or a religious purpose. The term justice is a concept of moral rightness based on ethics, rationality, law, religion, equity and fairness. Through these definitions it can tell us that both holiness and righteousness have different meanings. Although...
    1,150 Words | 3 Pages
  • Meaning of Life and Socrates - 2659 Words
     “The unexamined Life is not worth living” Socrates was considered by many to be the wisest man in ancient Greece. While he was eventually condemned for his wisdom, his spoken words are still listened to and followed today. When, during his trial, Socrates stated that, "the unexamined life is not worth living" (Plato 45), people began to question his theory. They began to wonder what Socrates meant with his statement, why he would feel that a life would not be worth living. To them,...
    2,659 Words | 7 Pages
  • Socrates, Body and Soul - 806 Words
     Body and Soul According to Socrates In the first part of the Phaedo, Socrates lays out his theory regarding the immortality of the soul. Near the end of this part he breaks down the body and soul and shows us that they are very different in permanence and structure. The body and soul, which are are interlinked when alive and separated at death, are fundamentally different constructs. The dichotomy here is expressed through the argument as opposites of composition, ideal...
    806 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Apology - Plato of Socrates - 625 Words
    The Apology is written by Plato of Socrates' trial, at 70 years of age Socrates was accused of impiety and corrupting the youth of Athens. Plato’s account consists of three speeches that were given by Socrates during this trial. Socrates speaks before the men of Athens, his jury, in 399 BCE and confesses he has forgotten who he was, he then recollects who he is, and finally he proclaims who Socrates is. The trial began with the prosecutors presenting their case against the accused before the...
    625 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle
    Mike W. Civ. 1: Sec, 121-10 Dr. Maria Farina Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, three men considered to be the quintessential basis of ancient Greek philosophy. Not only were they responsible for Greek enlightenment, but also foreshadowed the coming of Christ in there speculations. Plato, the protégé of Socrates, became the first to document the philosophy of his teacher, which in turn is passed down to Aristotle. This process of mentoring aided ancient man in the intellectual evolution of...
    872 Words | 3 Pages
  • Last Days of Socrates - 2280 Words
    Plato. The Last Days of Socrates. London: Penguin Books Ltd., 1993 Imagine the time just after the death of Socrates. The people of Athens were filled with questions about the final judgment of this well-known, long-time citizen of Athens. Socrates was accused at the end of his life of impiety and corruption of youth. Rumors, prejudices, and questions flew about the town. Plato experienced this situation when Socrates, his teacher and friend, accepted the ruling of death from an...
    2,280 Words | 6 Pages
  • Socrates' Common Good - 753 Words
    Socrates’ Perception of the Common Good What did Socrates believe so firmly that eventually caused him to be sentenced to death? Why must the Oracle of Delphi have proclaimed Socrates the wisest man of all? In Socrates’ eyes, there were a few qualities every human being is capable of possessing which make up the common good. He ardently believed that in order to achieve this, one must be humble, selfless, and open-minded. More importantly, Socrates seemed to stress that a person must stand up...
    753 Words | 2 Pages
  • Educational Theory of Socrates - 4392 Words
    The purpose of this essay is to give the reader an insight into the educational theories of Socrates. It is rather difficult to gain any information from first hand written accounts of Socrates work as he hardly ever took down notes and the only accounts that have stood the test of time are those that were documented by Plato, a student of Socrates. In actual fact most of what we know is from later people such as Aristophanes, Xenophen, Plato and Aristotle. These accounts are what have been...
    4,392 Words | 11 Pages
  • The Anti-Democratic Faces of Socrates
    The Anti-Democratic Faces of Socrates Socrates is among an elite class of extraordinary human beings. Whether it is religion, politics or socioeconomic issues, Socrates' philosophy had a profound impact on Athenian civilization. His thoughts and ideas have sparked many debates and examinations of the way we live our lives even today. In the three dialogues Defence of Socrates, Euthyphro, and Crito, written by the philosopher Plato, one can find evidence that Socrates was not an enthusiast for...
    1,005 Words | 3 Pages
  • socrates vs sophist - 704 Words
    Intro To Philosophy 1030-202 Socrates was not a Sophist; he never took money for his teaching, and rejected sophistical arguments.For one thing, the sophists taught for money. Socrates did not. For another, the sophists used language to win arguments and to sway people's opinion regardless of the truth. Socrates used language to attain the truth. Socrates lived as an independent man. he did not want to go under any category. He was not paid for his "irony" and maieutics. Therefore he...
    704 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates Sides with Creon or a
    Socrates’ Sides With? Through my reading of Plato’s Apology of Socrates and Crito, I have been able to see how Socrates makes important decisions and what he primarily bases his decisions on. As a individual person we have individual morals which lead us to our own moral or immoral decisions. Sometimes are own morals or beliefs might oppose the views of the state or the enforced law that clams to find justice. In this case we rely on our own beliefs that may be through...
    1,379 Words | 3 Pages
  • Allegory of the Cave and Socrates - 854 Words
    1.) "The Allegory of the Cave" - We often hear of various movements that are set out to try to protect our freedoms. We spend most of lives trying to defend our rights and keep ourselves liberated. However, how truly free are we? "The Allegory of the Cave" a story of prisoners in a cave , chained facing upward, by the legs and necks. They cannot move but their eyes are faced straight ahead at a wall. This wall is their world. They see the shadows of people, some carrying objects and others...
    854 Words | 2 Pages
  • Philosophy (Plato and Socrates) - 854 Words
    I. Short Answers 1. Plato uses the forms to discuss almost everything. Forms are general concepts that are used to classify different physical concepts. The forms are non physical, mental concepts. Plato utilizes the forms to prove mind-body dualism. The forms are real things, they exist, and are considered to be more real than physical things. It refers to things that are eternal, perfect, unchanging, and universal. The mind is also eternal, not the brain. Forms are concepts or ideas that...
    854 Words | 2 Pages
  • Socrates vs Gilgamesh - 1186 Words
    Joe Arce 19 Sept 2011 Socrates Vs. Gilgamesh Socrates’ view of death in the Phaedo, Crito, and Apology is complex. His argument tries to prove that philosophers, of all people, are in the best state to die or will be in the best state after life because of the life they lead. Socrates’ views are sharply contrasted in The Epic of Gilgamesh. In fact, he would probably say that Gilgamesh had not lived the proper kind of life and his views of life, and death would lead to an unsettled existence in...
    1,186 Words | 3 Pages


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